Posted on

What If Your Child’s Doctor Or Therapist Doesn’t Support Homeschooling?

what if your childs doctor or therapist doesnt support homeschooling

 
In this bonus episode, Colleen and Shawna answer a homeschooling mom’s question about doctors, therapists, and homeschooling. What do we do when doctors don’t support our decision to homeschool? How can we prepare for therapist visits and doctor appointments? When is it time to switch to a more homeschool friendly doctor?

What If Your Child's Doctor Or Therapist Doesn't Support Homeschooling?

Because this is a five week month, we are digging into a question that we are both frequently asked by homeschooling moms (particularly those who are homeschooling gifted and 2E children).

“Laura asks, How do you share homeschooling as a priority when you are dealing with doctors and therapists?”

This is something most of us will have to deal with at some point in our homeschooling journey, particularly if our children have learning differences. Let’s start with the basics.

Is It Possible To Homeschool A Child Who Needs Therapies And Interventions?

Not only is it possible to homeschool a child in need of therapies and medical interventions, in many cases, it is preferable. 

First off, It is legal to homeschool children with special needs in all 50 states. You have the same right to homeschool a child with differences as you do any other child.

When a child is in need of speech therapy, occupational therapy, educational therapy, and/or intense medical interventions, homeschooling provides a supportive and individualized atmosphere. Our children can learn at their own pace and do so in an environment that more closely aligns to their needs. 

What If Your Child's Doctor Or Therapist Doesn't Support Homeschooling?

How Do I Interact With Doctors And Therapists Who May Not Support My Decision To Homeschool?

There are a few things to keep in mind if it’s clear that your doctor or therapist doesn’t support your decision to homeschool.  This is a quick outline of what we share in the episode.

    • Prepare yourself to respond in a way that positions you as the “educator of your child” and not “just” the mom (Shawna walks you through a sample conversion in the episode).
    • Know that doctors are supposed to ask about school. That’s true for non-homeschoolers too. Try not to feel threatened by the questioning. 
    • You Don’t Have To Share All The Things. In fact, we recommend you come prepared to speak to one or two issues only. 
    • Sometimes, you may have to change doctors. It’s better to do it when you know it’s not working than to wait, and hope it will get better.

Incorporate Therapeutic Activities Into Your Homeschool 

The truth is, homeschooling can give your child a therapeutic advantage as well. Because you are able to individualize your approach and are with your child most of the time, therapies can be done almost seamlessly as part of your homeschool day

For example, these are just a few of our favorite sensory activities to use at home.

pelpo 40Fidget Toys - Super Sensory Textured Stretchy Strings - 6 PackLITTLE CHUBBY ONE Kids Velvet Play Sand Dino Egg Set - Toy Magic Sand Set - Includes 12 Eggs with Sand Plus Dinosaur Surprise Sensory Toy for Girls and Boys Age 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10NALANDA Wobble Balance Board, Core Trainer for Balance Training and Exercising, Healthy Material Non-Skid TPE Bump Surface, Stability Board for Kids and AdultsSticky Balls - Fidget Pack of 8 - Squishy Glow in The Dark Sensory Ball Stress Toys - Sticks to Ceiling and Wall - Stress Relief Gifts, Party Supplies, Anxiety Relief Items for Kids and AdultsTrideer Newest Exercise Ball, Yoga Ball for Home Gym & Desk Chair - Fitness, Yoga & Physical Therapy, with Quick Pump [ Sweet Series, 55cm & 65 cm ] (ice Cream, 65cm)

 

Planning And Preparing For Your Next Appointment

In order to help you feel more comfortable heading into your next doctor’s appointment of therapy session, I’ve created a little cheat sheet to help you organize your thoughts and make the most out of your visit.

Raising Lifelong Learners Podcast Episode 112: Working With Your Child’s Doctors and Therapists

What If Your Child's Doctor Or Therapist Doesn't Support Homeschooling?

For a much more comprehensive answer to this question, please join us in today’s podcast discussion. 

 

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

The Everything Parent's Guide To Sensory Processing Disorder: The Information and Treatment Options You Need to Help Your Child with SPDHomeschooling Your Child With Special Needs: Practical Support And Encouragement For Learning With DifferencesSelf Regulation and Mindfulness Activities for Sensory Processing Disorder: Creative Strategies to Help Children Focus and Remain CalmRaising a Sensory Smart Child: The Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Processing Issues, Revised and Updated EditionHandbook of Evidence-Based Interventions for Children and AdolescentsSensory Processing Disorder Answer Book: Practical Answers to the Top 250 Questions Parents Ask (Special Needs Parenting Answer Book)Rhythms of Relating in Children's TherapiesHandbook of Evidence-Based Therapies for Children and Adolescents: Bridging Science and Practice (Issues in Clinical Child Psychology)Healing Child and Family Trauma through Expressive and Play Therapies: Art, Nature, Storytelling, Body & Mindfulness

 
 

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 

Posted on

What Does A Gifted Homeschool Graduate Really Think About Homeschooling?

what does a gifted homeschool graduate really think about homeschooling


Have you ever wanted to ask a homeschool graduate what they thought about their homeschool experience? Are you curious about what an adult life after homeschool looks like? I get all the answers from Samantha Shank, a brilliant homeschool graduate, highly successful business owner, and highly gifted, eclectic learner. 
 

What Does A Gifted Homeschool Graduate Really Think About Homeschooling?

I absolutely adored my conversation with Samantha Shank, from Learn in Color. Not only is she a homeschool graduate, she is also an obviously gifted, eclectic thinker, whose enthusiasm for learning is contagious.

These are some highlights from our time together.

Related: Interest-Led Homeschooling And Your Gifted Child

What Does A Gifted Homeschool Graduate Really Think About Homeschooling?

The Most Important Things Parents Can Do For Their Homeschooled Children

As a homeschool graduate, who graduated from high school and college early, Samantha believes the most important thing her parents did for her education was simply this – 

“They let me learn.”

Sam’s experience and ultimate success, is one of the reasons I feel so strongly that interest-led, child-directed learning produces the very best outcomes for gifted learners. For a example, her passion for World War Two was the flickering flame that launched an entire business. 

Other experiences that Samantha remembers as essential to her homeschool education were:

  • Weekly Library Trips
  • Encouraging Outside Groups and Connections (I think Samantha is going to be Miss America someday!)
  • Her parent’s encouraging her to try new things, knowing that not everything would be a fit
  • Helping her learn to fail in a safe and supportive environment

What Does A Gifted Homeschool Graduate Really Think About Homeschooling?

Homeschooling High School, College, and Beyond

One of the most encouraging topics we covered was Samantha’s homeschool experience through high school and college. It’s clear that her passion for learning fueled not only her studies and interests, but her ability to build a flourishing business.

She attributes much of this success to her parent’s decision to homeschool her, specifically in an interest-led eclectic way.

Samantha is also quite encouraging for those of us who worry about our kids not fitting in or struggling to establish friendships. Her advice for our kids?

Do you. It may not happen in your city or your area, but eventually, you will find your people who share your interests. Find your group of friends in your own nontraditional way. You don’t have to sacrifice your core personality for friendship.

Samantha Shank, Learn in Color

What Does A Gifted Homeschool Graduate Really Think About Homeschooling?

If you are homeschooling a gifted learner, I think you will not only enjoy Sam’s episode, but find so much inspiration and encouragement!

Samantha Shank, Learn in Color

The Raising Lifelong Leaners Podcast, Episode 111: A Conversation With Homeschool Graduate Turned Business Owner, Samantha Shank

 
 

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

         

 

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 
 
 

Posted on

A Quick Guide To Homeschooling High School For Gifted Children

a quick guide to homeschooling high school for gifted children

 
Homeschooling high school, particularly when your child is gifted and twice-exceptional, has its own unique set of challenges and rewards. This quick guide provides encouragement, practical tips, and real examples you won’t want to miss!

homeschooling high school

 

A Guide To Homeschooling High School For Gifted Children

One of the very first questions I’m asked about homeschooling high school is, “What do I do about course credit and transcripts?”

It is always a top concern, especially for parents who graduated in a more traditional high school setting. The good news is, this is actually one of the easiest things to tackle, when you have the right resources!

homeschooling high school

 

Resources For Creating Homeschool Transcripts

Homeschooling High School By Design E-course

How To Create A Transcript As Relaxed Homeschoolers

Getting Started With High School Course Descriptions and Credits

homeschooling high school

 

What’s The Most Important Part Of Homeschooling High School For Gifted Children?

Once you feel comfortable with the paperwork associated with homeschooling high school, it’s easier to focus on the very best and most important parts of homeschooling high school. 

Homeschooling high school is really more about helping your child learn, than it is teaching all the things. Most homeschool moms of high schoolers will tell you that their role as homeschool mom changed considerably over the course of the high school years. 

Shared Responsibility And Planning

One natural change is the level of involvement your child should have over their own high school plan. Sharing responsibility for the learning itself, as well as the planning associated with it (including curriculum selection, etc.) gradually changes for most families. The shift in my own life went from me being almost entirely responsible in my son’s freshman year, to him being almost entirely responsible in his senior year. 

Mentor vs. Teacher

Part of this shift includes a change in our overall roles as homeschool moms. 

As the high school years pass, expect to find your role in your child’s learning changing from “teacher” to “mentor.” This can be disconcerting at first, but the truth is, it can also bring so much more joy and accomplishment to both mentor and learner.

Materials, Time, And Resources 

I absolutely love this quote from my friend and expert high school homeschooler, Heather. 

homeschooling high school

It’s a great summary of what our kids really need from us as they progress through high school. They tell us what they need in order to learn, and we get it for them!

Why The Learner’s Lab Is So Helpful For Gifted And 2E High Schoolers…

The Learner's Lab

You Don’t Have To Homeschool High School Alone

The Learner’s Lab is the community created just for your quirky family.  It’s full of creative lessons, problem solving activities, critical and divergent thinking games, and the social-emotional support differently-wired children and teens need most.

All from the comfort of your own home. 

Interaction with Other High Schoolers

One element of The Learner’s Lab that has been the most impactful for high school learners is the monthly live sessions with other teens. I have been so pleasantly surprised to see the level of interaction, interest, and engagement with our high schoolers. A few have even become good friends in life outside the platform!

Social and Emotional Learning Balances Academic Learning

This community was created to support children who are gifted and twice exceptional. We cover social and emotional learning as a support to academics,  all year long, in a way that is educational and fun for teens. They learn skills to help them succeed, and you learn how to help them along the way. 

We invite you to join us. Get all the details HERE.

words.png copy

Homeschooling High School: A Conversation With Heather Woodie

I think that one of the very best ways to learn about homeschooling any age group, is to ask another homeschool mom who has already navigated it. I was so lucky to be able to do that this week for the high school years! You can find all the questions and answers, as well as so much encouragement in my latest episode of the Raising Lifelong Learners Podcast, Episode 109: A Conversation with Heather Woodie.

homeschooling high school

 
 

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

         

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 

Posted on

Why Self-Care Is Important For Our Children Too

why self care is important for our children too

 
Self-care has become an increasingly popular topic in recent years, and for good reason. As parents, we simply must take care of ourselves in order to take care of our children. But what about our kids, especially those who are gifted and twice exceptional? How do we help them learn coping skills and emotional regulation? How do we help them identify what they need to take care of their own bodies and souls?

self-care for kids

 

Self-Care For Parents Of Gifted Children

I am not sure there is any doubt at this point, that self-care is a necessity in our lives as parents. (If I hear the “put your oxygen mask on first” analogy one more time, I may scream.)

The reality is that practical self-care often looks a lot different than how self-care is portrayed on social media. Add the complex set of issues associated with neurodiverse, gifted children, and self-care can often feel like an overwhelming, yet another-thing-to-do task.

The good news is, self-care is not always bubble baths and vacations. Most of the time, it’s small, practical, and intentional choices that help us maintain balance.

Here are some small, realistic examples of practical self-care for parents of gifted children.

  • Going on a walk
  • Listening to a podcast while doing the dishes
  • Reading a book
  • Going to bed early
  • Hiding in the closet and eating chocolate
  • Watching a show with your husband

Now, if we can just stop feeling guilty for  doing them!

self care is important for children too

 

Why Self-Care Is Important For Our Children Too

We have an opportunity to teach our children how to develop self-care and coping skills the same way we teach almost any other topic.

It’s worth it! These skills benefit our children in a variety of ways. Decreased anxiety, increased self-confidence, and more comfortable social interactions are just a few of the benefits of self-care for our children.

self care is important for children too

 

Helping Our Children Develop Self-Care Strategies

These are just a few suggestions for incorporating this type of learning into our everyday lives with our children. 

Modeling Self-Care Skills For Our Children

One of the best ways to help our children develop healthy self-care habits, is to model them. 

This means being intentional about how we employ our own self-care and being overt in bringing their attention to it. For example, saying “I am feeling a bit low today. I am going to take a walk in the sunshine,” is far more effective than any lecture about the benefits of the sun on our moods.

Have A Plan For Your Child’s Self-Care

Whether or not your child struggles with executive functioning, they will likely need you to help them develop a plan for their own self-care.

For years, I have helped my kids pack a bag filled with items and activities to help them feel calm and centered when we are out and about. Because I helped them create this plan initially, as they have gotten older, they’ve learned to do it on their own.

Self-Care Practice Makes Perfect

It takes time for self-care and overall coping skills to develop. Please know, none of us are immune to the frustration that comes from trying to help our child, only to see them continue to struggle.

As with all social and emotional skills, our children need time, often years, to begin to feel a sense of understanding and control. Consider it practice, not a failure, when your child is not able to employ even the most well thought out plan for self-care.

Given time and practice, self-care can become an essential component of our children’s lives. 

 

A Conversation with Colleen and Shawna All About Realistic, Real Life Self-Care

self-care for kids

 

Colleen and Shawna take this episode to talk through the practical realities associated with self-care for ourselves and for our children. (Don’t miss Colleen’s story about meeting her husband in the driveway and Shawna’s son thinking her doing the dishes is somehow self-care!)

self care

 

Links And Resources From Today’s Episode

         

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


Posted on

RLL #107: Learning as an Unschooling Family with Robyn Robertson

rll 107 learning as an unschooling family with robyn robertson

 

I truly believe that the best way we can educate our gifted and twice-exceptional (2E) kids is through homeschooling with self-directed learning and unschooling.

Self-Directed Learning vs. Unschooling?

Self-directed learning is a self-motivated pursuit of knowledge not based on a required set of circumstances but learning for its own sake. Using an unschooling approach to learning simply means that activities and lessons are not structured or required.

Children constantly learn through their interactions and experiences with the world around them.  Many families find that creating their own flexible homeschool and allowing their kids to be the driving force in their learning is the very best educational option for our above-average kids.

RLL #107: Learning as an Unschooling Family with Robyn Robertson

Self-directed learning and unschooling is better for gifted and 2E learners

Our kids aren’t cookie cutter, why would we think a one size fits all of educating will fit them? An example might be a kiddo who loves math and excels ahead of his same-age peers but is also struggling with reading. We could encourage his reading through the “strewing” of picture books about math, making them available for him to discover. This would likely be more interesting to him than a remedial reading curriculum. 

A lot of gifted kids are energized by making “dive deeps” into areas of interest. In our family, there is a genuine need to go into detailed study! Just because measures like tests or projects show mastery has occurred doesn’t mean our kids are done with learning about the subject. With self-directed homeschooling, limits are easily removed in open-ended learning at home; there is no timetable to follow. By exploring those tangents, our kids are motivated to learn more in depth and with greater passion.

The benefits of self-directed learning and unschooling point to just how good it is for gifted and 2E kids.

There’s a confidence that comes to children when they have buy-in to their learning. Self-directed learners are motivated in their learning and hesitate less to investigate new things.

More flexible learning gives us a way where overexcitabilities and asynchrony are less of an issue. Home is a safer environment in which to learn strategies to handle differences and adjust behaviors.  Homeschooling parents are readily available to give our kids the support they need if they’re asynchronous. Scaffolding can provide for areas where our child might struggle, so that they can continue to learn and create at their level. Take for example the child who has difficulty with handwriting, but who has a great imagination and concocts wonderfully imaginative stories. Allowing her to dictate her story to a parent to record is a way of giving her space to explore her talent as a “writer” while supporting her as she works on penmanship.

Unschooling benefits the whole family by creating space to create.

Grace Llewellyn explains, “You don’t need a schoolteacher to get knowledge – you can get it from looking at the world, from watching films, from conversations, from reading, from asking questions, from experience. When you get down to it, unschooling is really just a fancy term for ‘life’ or ‘growing up uninstitutionalized.’” 

Unschooling gives us more room to explore interests and have wonderful life experiences in the safest of environments, within the family, those relationships will always be their very best teacher. Important skills like critical thinking, problem solving, fostering authenticity and lifelong learning take time and attention which we can adjust and focus on while we homeschool.

Ultimately, as parents of these “outside-the-box thinkers,” we learn to trust our children better and respect their learning needs. All kids have an intrinsic desire to learn and create; but our kids tend towards MORE of everything. In self-directed learning and unschooling, we can be our kiddos’ greatest champion, cheering them on to becoming the very best people they can be.

unschooling life learning grace llewellyn

Families who already use self-directed learning and unschooling provide support and encouragement.

This week’s podcast episode is a conversation with Robyn Robertson of Honey I’m Homeschooling the Kids. She shares the background of her unschooling family and makes an important analogy of self-directed learning as being a journey we travel on with our entire family.  Some of the ideas Robyn and Colleen share in this episode are:

  • Travel together as a family in your learning, even if everyone is learning about different things.
  • Keep going back to knowing why you’re doing it and adjust as needed.
  • Experience life together, share stories as a family. This will cause you to build connections through these shared experiences.
  • Take field trips, have family projects, attend independent classes and enrichment programs, enroll in online courses and exercise programs, and leave room for a lot of personal time. If the individual wants to pursue a formal class, that can be unschooling as well!

Learning Mindset Happiness is goal Robyn Robertson

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

            

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 

Posted on

RLL #106: [Audioblog] Young Gifted Children | Reflections from Parents

rll 106 audioblog young gifted children reflections from parents


Did you just know that your child was gifted from the start? You know, that feeling down deep in your gut that something was different about your tiny tot, but you weren’t able to completely pinpoint it?  Or maybe you went straight to a search engine with questions like, “signs my baby is gifted” or “What age can you tell if your child is gifted?”

Research shows that parents are pretty accurate when identifying their young children as gifted.  Whether early talking or walking, having extreme abilities of observation or learning, or even needing little sleep, a lot of our quirky kids start demonstrating unusually advanced behaviors from a very young age!

Today’s episode is an audioblog of a post that first appeared on the website, where Colleen asked parents to think back to when their young children were infants or toddlers. The responses were fascinating! Listen as parents share in their own words what traits and characteristics they could see now, in hindsight, that made them realize their child was gifted.  

RLL #106: [Audioblog] Young Gifted Children | Reflections from Parents

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

         

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 

Posted on

RLL #105: Parenting ADHD and Autism with Penny Williams

rll 105 parenting adhd and autism with penny williams


Parenting our neurodiverse kiddos, whether gifted or twice-exceptional kiddos (including autistic and ADHD), is just plain different. Typical parenting books and practices won’t always work when we’re trying to find ways to help our children become the very best people they can be. Parenting them takes intentionality and a different kind of parenting mindset.

Today, Colleen speaks with Penny Williams of Parenting ADHD and Autism about how we really need to be okay with who our neurodiverse kiddos are and learn how to celebrate their differences.  This is a terrific conversation to glean wisdom from two parents who have faced struggles that are common in parenting atypical kids.

RLL #105: Parenting ADHD and Autism with Penny Williams

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

            

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 

Posted on

RLL #104: A Conversation About Mindset with Shawna Wingert

rll 104 a conversation about mindset with shawna wingert

 

Mindset is generally thought to be the attitudes or habits of an individual’s mind that is formed by previous experience. These attitudes can predetermine a person’s response or interpretation to any given situation. Our quirky kiddos are not immune to “fixed” mindsets, and it can sometimes be a real challenge to help them to see things in a different way or try a new approach to something that has them stumped.

Today, Colleen and Shawna Wingert have a conversation about mindset, specifically to help families like ours move away from rigid and inflexible thinking. They also discuss the incredible resources inside the RLL membership community, The Learner’s Lab, and how families can work on social/emotional needs like mindset through the fun lessons and activities for kiddos, the parent master classes and the monthly online teen chats.

RLL #104: A Conversation on Mindset with Shawna Wingert

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

                     

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 

Posted on

RLL #103: Entrepreneurial Mindset with Brian Weisfeld

rll 103 entrepreneurial mindset with brian weisfeld


Here at Raising Lifelong Learners, we are very much concerned with promoting the social and emotional needs of gifted and twice exceptional children. Research shows that resiliency, adaptability, accepting rejection, and “bouncing back” from failure are some of the critical skills necessary for having a successful life. They are also vital skills for being a successful entrepreneur!

Today, Colleen speaks with Brian Weisfeld, girls’ entrepreneurship advocate and author of The Start Up Squad, about how encouraging an entrepreneurial mindset can be a key component to helping all kids, boys included, to develop these important life skills, follow their passions, and reach their full potential even beyond kids starting their own businesses.

RLL #103: Entrepreneurial Mindset with Brian Weisfeld

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

               

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!


 

Posted on

RLL #102: A Conversation about Connection with Shawna Wingert

rll 102 a conversation about connection with shawna wingert


Today, we begin featuring a new type of podcast episode at Raising Lifelong Learners with Colleen Kessler, what we’re calling “A Conversation About.”  Colleen will be meeting with Shawna Wingert of Different By Design Learning at least monthly to discuss topics, common struggles and questions that come up often with our quirky and “outside-the-box” kiddos and families.  This week’s conversation centers around connection: how important it is to foster connection with your kids, encourage the relationships between siblings, and build a culture of connection as a family and as part of your community.

RLL #102: A Conversation about Connection with Shawna Wingert

Links and Resources from Today’s Show:

         

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!